mixed media

An artist and sculptural jeweler, Crystal Hartman creates abstract botanical art rooted in storytelling and process. Growing up behind the jeweler’s bench at Durango Silver Company, she developed a conversation with line, design and space from an early age. Hartman received her BFA for Printmaking from the University of Colorado at Boulder; while there she received a UROP Grant and studied Femininity in Argentina and began working in video and installation. Upon graduation, she filmed for Null Skateboards in Spain, during this time her artwork was featured in the exhibition United BAC! at the CCCB, Center for Contemporary Culture Barcelona and exhibited at locations such as the National Palace of Culture, Sophia Bulgaria and the Florean Museum, Baia Mare, Romania and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Boulder Colorado . Hartman studied contemporary craft and color in Chiang Mai Thailand before returning to the United States and reflecting on the adventures through watercolors that received the Merwin Altfeld Memorial Award for Storytelling in the Arts and membership as a Signature Member of the National Watercolor Society. She founded and directed Durango Open Studio, an event celebrating and sharing lifestyles and process in the arts and began curating exhibitions aimed at fostering conversations between various generations of artists. Finding her way back to the jewelers bench through a love of wax and sculpture, her jewelry has been featured in Art Jewelry Magazine and included in exhibitions such as TOP Jewels: International Jewelry Exhibition at the Durango Arts Center and Earthly Delights: Metalsmiths Inspired by Nature at the Lillstreet Gallery, Chicago, IL. Hartman enjoys creating Visual Reviews of Poetry for CutBank Literary Journal and working with writers to develop imagery to hold their stories. Hartman maintains a painting and jewelry studio creating sculptural adornment in the lost wax process and is currently studying light and sound in Champaign Illinois.

I have a degree in Materials Engineering and had a successful career in product development and project management. In my 30’s, my husband and I relocated from the East Coast to rural central Illinois. Needless to say, job prospects in my field were minimal, especially at the level my career had reached. During that next phase of my life, my husband and I bought a major fixer upper and did the work ourselves.
When we were upgrading the electric system that was originally from the time of Illinois’s “Rural Electrification Act” (circa 19305 - 1945) I found myself surrounded by so much copper wire. It was breathtaking! I absentmindedly created a bracelet and a ring with some of the wire that was sitting on the floor. That was the moment I discovered my new calling.

My foray into metalsmithing was a continued series of happy accidents that lead me to where I am now. I began making items for friends and family, who spread the word to others. Soon I was having strangers commission my to make special items from scraps of wire from their homes to keep or give as mementos. With all of this success I decided to venture out into a bigger audience and eventually entered a contest. that I won, with Uncommon Goods focused on making items with recycled or reclaimed materials. That win lead to a contract with the catalog and it kept growing from there as I moved into wholesale.

It all happened so fast and was very exciting at first. Orders came in, bulk product went out. Then I realized that I was missing out on doing what I loved, making one of a kind items that were as special and unique as the person who will wear it. So once again, at the height of my second career, I found myself pivoting direction and returning to the roots of my passion. Taking materials that are unique with a history all their own, and transforming them into one of a kind heirlooms to be treasured for generations to come, just like that old house my husband and I renovated.

Now I am happily in this next phase of life where I am motivated by my own internal passions and choose uniqueness and quality over quantity. I enjoy meeting the person who chooses one of my items and hearing what moves them about a piece. I love connecting on social media with them and seeing how that piece brings them joy after it leaves my hands. People don’t need jewelry in their life, but it sure brings them happiness. I am proud and honored to be someone who added a piece of happiness of so many peoples lives.

I am a traditional artist and digital artist. I sell my art and do work for others. I am currently planning to attend parkland and then move onto the Chicago Institute of Art.

Born and raised on a farm near White Heath, IL, I was blessed with lots of creativity, but not lots of money. I spent many days out in the country with my Grandma, where I learned crafting, gardening, basic homemaking skills, and how to make something out of nothing. Those skills and memories are some of my most valued to this day.
I've always been able to draw and paint and was often the kid in class that got called out to do great things in art. At first, it made me happy, but then soon realized the kids that didn't get picked were good at art too, they just did it different than everyone else. I think that it's this time on my life that I started to value the differences in us, as a way of learning and growing.
After Graduating from the University of Illinois with a BFA in Graphic Design, I set out for the big city of Chicago to start my adult life. I have been a graphic designer, window display artist, retail manager, floral shop owner and winery tour and experience manager in Texas.
I recently moved back to Urbana (with my husband, 2 dogs and cat) to be near my family and am happy to be working full-time at Japan House at the University of Illinois as well as part time at Prairie Fruits Farm.
I hope to continue to explore making things...I don't invent things...I imvent them!

Mix media artist self thought loving what I do

Former archaeologist Sarah Wisseman took ceramics classes in college to learn how ancient pottery was formed and fired. When she realized she needed new skills to decorate the ceramic surfaces, painting took over. Sarah has studied ceramics, drawing, painting, collage, paper marbling, printing, and encaustic in numerous classes at Harvard University, the Champaign Park District, the University of Illinois, Parkland College, and Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Tennessee. Her paintings have shown at galleries and other venues in Champaign-Urbana and in Clarksdale, Mississippi, where her daughter lives.

Now that she is retired from her University of Illinois job as director of the Program on Ancient Technologies and Archaeological Materials, Sarah splits her time between painting and writing archaeological mysteries.

Artist/printmaker specializing in linocut and woodcut prints. Urbana, Illinois.

Sandra Allain was born in Bogota, Colombia and moved to the U.S. (Urbana-Champaign) in August 2013, where she lives with her family.

She creates abstract paintings and collages, and also writes poetry inspired by words, reflections and the imbalance of society. She has worked with pastels, watercolor, ceramic, porcelain and acrylic at different stages in her life, experience that has influenced her preferred techniques. Her medium of choice is acrylic. The use of bronze and gold on most of her paintings gives warmth to her pieces and an increased contrast between highlights and shadows, a glow which characterizes her work and personality. www.sandraallain.com

Sandra Allain will be featured in the juried show "Science & Art" at Arterie Fine Arts in Naperville, IL from September 2 through September 30th.

The Opening Artists Reception and Awards Ceremony will be held on Saturday, September 13th from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Arterie Fine Arts 190 E. Fifth Avenue Naperville, IL 60563, +1 630-428-4639 http://arteriefinearts.com/artwork/3575736_Entropy.html

Hua

At a very young age, Hua Nian and her family were forcibly moved from Beijing to a small rural town in southern China during the political upheaval of the Cultural Revolution. This harsh childhood experience and rigid environment prepared her to become a close observer of the world. The move to the United States made a profound impact on her life, and on her making and thinking about art. The strong contrast of Chinese and American cultures inspired her to transform all her personal experience into new, fertile soil. From her early “Mask” printmaking series to her current series of acrylic paintings, “Where the Wild Things Glow”, Nian expresses feelings about our ongoing life under the force of nature and the scale of history.

As a signature artist of the International Society of Acrylic painters (ISAP) and the National Oil and Acrylic Painters’ Society (NOAPS), Ms. Nian’s paintings have been shown in numerous art exhibitions thought out U.S. and in Germany, Australia and China. She has been a frequent award winner at various local, states, and national shows, and her works have been widely collected by co-ops, universities, and by numerous private collectors around the country. Her works and interviews have been featured in the American Artist Magazine, the Chicago Sun-Times, Dialogue: An Art Journal, and in numerous local and Chinese newspaper and magazines, as well as cover art for books, music CDs, and posters produced by Stanford University and others.

Ms. Nian moved to the USA in 1992 from China, after years of teaching photojournalism in Jinan University in Guangzhou. She received her Master’s degree in Art Education from Pittsburg State University, Kansas in 1996, and is now an active exhibiting artist and art instructor at her studio —Hua Nian Art Studio. She lives and works with her husband and two children in Urbana, Illinois.

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