fashion

I am an artist and jeweler creating abstract botanical works rooted in line and storytelling. Growing up behind the jeweler’s bench at Durango Silver Company, I began sculpturally carving wax and studying the human for around age 7. I studied Printmaking focused on Intaglio Etching at the University of Colorado at Boulde where I received a UROP grant to study Femininity in Argentina. After receiving my BFA, I filmed skateboarding for Null Skateboards in Barcelona and the Canary Islands, Spain and exhibited video installations, one was featured in the exhibition United BAC! at the CCCB, Center for Contemporary Culture Barcelona. I lived in Chiang Mai Thailand and studied cultural craft -natural dyes, batik, and grafiti, I carried these textures back to the United States and into watercolor that made me a Signature Member of the National Watercolor Society, receiving the Merwin Altfeld Memorial Award for Storytelling in the Arts. Back home in Durango, I founded and directed Durango Open Studio, an event celebrating and sharing lifestyles and process in the arts and began digging into my roots in adornment.
I create sculptural jewelry inspired by storytelling and nature. It has been featured in Art Jewelry Magazine and included in exhibitions such as TOP Jewels: International Jewelry Exhibition at the Durango Arts Center and Earthly Delights: Metalsmiths Inspired by Nature at the Lillstreet Gallery, Chicago, IL. To balance carving miniature sculptures in wax, I illustrate and paint, often in large scale, creating canvases and scrolls shown at small galleries, DIY spaces and locations such as The National Palace of Culture, Sofia Bulgaria, and the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, Colorado USA. I maintain a studio creating sculptural adornment, illustrating and painting in Southwest Colorado and am currently studying sound and light in Champaign Illinois.

I am a photographer with a background in photojournalism, fine art portraiture and landscape photography. Although I use digital and film based cameras, my love is wet plate collodion. It is a process invented in the 1850's which uses chemistry, glass, metal, a big view camera and a little bit of sunlight to create photographs.

I have been using the process for nearly 10 years and find it so rewarding. I started making wet plate images after the world seemed to convert from film based cameras to digital. I was working for a newspaper at the time, and we moved from the darkroom to the newsroom. The convenience of digital cannot be matched, but I felt like I lost the creative part that drew me to photography.

I have been using the wet plate process as a living historian, demonstrating the process as it would have been done at Civil War and other history events. I dress in wool, live in a tent for the weekend, explain and demonstrate the process to participants as well as the public.

I also create landscape, still life and modern portraiture with the processes as well. It is a lot of fun, and a complicated but enjoyable way to make photographs :)

You can see more of my work by checking out the links to my web page and my Facebook fan page. Enjoy!

If I have to put myself into a box, I suppose I am a fashion/ textile artist. I have been making my own clothes since high school, when my mother bought me my first sewing machine, it wasn't until college that my obsession with textiles really took off. I knit, sew, crochet, even weave and have learned primarily through experimentation.
While in college, I majored in anthropology and minored in linguistics. This has had a deep (if not defining) impact on both how I view textiles and handicrafts, and how I approach my own handiwork. That is to say, I am always aware how what we wear communicates with those around us, of the messages embedded within art; of the rich histories and traditions behind each craft as well as the innovations and new breaths of life being given to those same crafts.

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