music

Saturday, November 7, 2015 (All day)
The Urbana Free Library

The Champaign-Urbana Folk & Roots Festival is an annual event that promotes the folk arts and contributes to the artistic vitality of central Illinois. As a venue sponsor, The Urbana Free Library is pleased to participate in this vibrant community event. All festival events at the Library are FREE and will take place in the Lewis Auditorium, Busey-Mills Reading Room, and Satterthwaite Conference Room.

Lewis Auditorium:
10:00 AM Bodhrán Workshop with Tim Mulvenna
11:15 AM: Prairie Breezes Family Concert with Barb Silverman and Colby Maddox
12:00 PM: Local Storytellers Showcase: Stories for Families featuring Camille Born, UFL Children's Librarian Elaine Bearden, and Linda Dust
1:00 PM: Featured Storyteller, Anne Shimojima
2:00 PM: Local Storytellers Showcase: More Stories for Families featuring Kim Sheahan and Kath Brinkmann
3:45 PM: U of I Press Panel with Phil Jamison and Marion Jacobson

This month's special Prairie Breezes concert is a collaboration of The Urbana Free Library and the C-U Folk & Roots Festival, and is generously sponsored by Peggy and Bob Podlasek in memory of Greg Bliss.

Busey-Mills Reading Room:
10:30 AM: Orpheus Mandolin Orchestra
11:45 AM: Singer-Songwriter Lynn O'Brien
1:15 PM: Bluegrass & Country with Idea Garden
2:45 PM: Singer-Songwriter David Francey
4:00 PM: Singer-Songwriter, John Gorka

Satterthwaite Conference Room:
3:15 PM: Storytelling Workshop with Anne Shimojima, "You Can Tell a Story Too!."
Folk tales, stories of the human condition, trials and tribulations, love lost and found, and journeying on the quest, have been passed down through the generations from teller to listener. Join storyteller Anne Shimojima as she shares tips on how to learn and tell a folk tale. Anne brings 30+ years of storytelling experience to this fast-paced hour of both theory and practice.

To see a complete schedule of festival events, visit folkandroots.org

Saturday, November 7, 2015 - 9:30am to 4:45pm
Landmark Hotel Ballroom, 210 S. Race Street, Urbana
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The Sousa Archives and Center for American Music is again sponsoring a series of free family performances as part of the 2015 Champaign-Urbana Folk and Roots Festival. The performers and special activities include a family dance with Barb Silverman and Colby Maddox, a children’s sing along with Mr. Stephens, a musical marionettes parade with Anne Newman, a flat foot dance workshop with Phil Jamison, Irish set dancing with Daniel Flora, English and Scandinavian dance instruction with Jon and Sue Hanson, and music performances by the bands The Amigos and Noah I. Brown & Company, and a special concert of Sousa marches by the Urbana High School Wind Symphony in honor of the March King’s 161st birthday. All of this programming is free and open to the general public. For further information either call 217-333-4577 or visit http://folkandroots.org/.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - 7:30pm
Memorial Room, Smith Memorial Hall, 805 S. Matthews Avenue, Urbana
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In a dark and desperate portrayal of America during the country’s Great Depression, Chris Rainier presents an evening of music by the maverick microtonal American composer, theorist and instrument-builder, Harry Partch [1901-1974]. This intimate performance will focus on Partch's rarely-heard works for voice and adapted guitar which were composed during his years spent as a hobo riding the rails through 1930's America. Partch’s early music provides a sampling of the many hitchhiker's inscriptions, snatches of inebriated dialogue, and letters from ex-convicts he encountered during his travels, and they are all brought to life using his unique microtonal scale of 43 notes to the octave that will be performed on a specially commissioned guitar for this music. For further information contact the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music at 217-333-4577 or email sousa@illinois.edu.

Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 12:00pm
Sousa Archives and Center for American Music, Harding Band Building, 1103 S. 6th Street, Champaign
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In 1958, Lejaren Hiller Jr. founded the Experimental Music Studio (EMS) at the University of Illinois with the intention of creating and developing electronic and computer music. Due to the EMS’ interdisciplinary nature, the studio attracted the attention of James Beauchamp in 1961, one of the most important contributors to the development of electronic music at the University of Illinois. After receiving a Master’s degree in electrical engineering at the University of Michigan in 1961 and working for a year in Los Angles at a space technology company, Beauchamp came to the University of Illinois in 1962 as a PhD student in electrical engineering, assuming a fellowship under a 3-year grant from the Magnavox Corporation for his early work in the EMS. In 1964, under the direction of Hiller, Beauchamp completed the Harmonic Tone Generator (HTG), one of the first voltage-controlled electronic music synthesizers developed in America. Join James Beauchamp in a special presentation on the development of the HTG and its use in Kenneth Gaburo’s Lemon Drops and Salvatore Martirano’s Underworld. For further information contact the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music at 217-333-4577 or email sousa@illinois.edu.

Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 12:00pm
Sousa Archives and Center for American Music, Harding Band Building, 1103 S. 6th Street, Champaign
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Harry Partch purchased and adapted his first guitar in 1934 and used this instrument to create and perform two of his most recognized early works, Barstow and U.S. Highball. This instrument was fitted with raised stainless steel frets that were attached to a brass plate that was screwed onto the neck of the guitar. This modified fret board provided Partch with the ability to use just intonation for his early works. In 1945 he adapted his second guitar by attaching a smooth narrow fingerboard to the neck of the guitar and adding additional pinheads and brass rivets to the fret board to create a microtonal compatible instrument. That same year he also similarly adapted a Hawaiian guitar that utilized ten strings which provided him with a broader tonal range that could be used for his different music compositions. Join Chris Rainier in a special lecture performance that discusses Partch’s varied use of the guitar in his early music compositions, and Rainier’s efforts to recreate and learn to play Partch’s microtonal guitar. For further information contact the Sousa Archives and Center for American Music at 217-333-4577 or email sousa@illinois.edu.

Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 7:30pm
Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts Lobby, 500 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana
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This year Dance at Illinois celebrates the choreographic contributions our inventive faculty and students, both past and present, have made and will make to the field. We celebrate the life of Professor Emeritus, Beverly Blossom, by reconstructing one of her signature works, Brides. Blossom, a former dancer with Nikolais Dance Theater, was an extraordinary choreographer and performer renowned for her wit, humor, and elaborate props.

Recently inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, faculty artist Tere O’Connor will create a new work for students, fashioning a cloud of humans in constant motion as a continuation of his research.

Following premieres of work in Chile, New York, Minneapolis, and Washington, DC, celebrated resident dance artists Cynthia Oliver and Linda Lehovec will create new work for our students. Our choreographic distinction lies in our future, so we have invited undergraduate students Charles Gowin and Katherine Williams to represent the next voices in the field of dance. For further information visit http://krannertcenter.com/.

Friday, November 13, 2015 - 7:30pm
Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts Lobby, 500 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana
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This year Dance at Illinois celebrates the choreographic contributions our inventive faculty and students, both past and present, have made and will make to the field. We celebrate the life of Professor Emeritus, Beverly Blossom, by reconstructing one of her signature works, Brides. Blossom, a former dancer with Nikolais Dance Theater, was an extraordinary choreographer and performer renowned for her wit, humor, and elaborate props.

Recently inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, faculty artist Tere O’Connor will create a new work for students, fashioning a cloud of humans in constant motion as a continuation of his research.

Following premieres of work in Chile, New York, Minneapolis, and Washington, DC, celebrated resident dance artists Cynthia Oliver and Linda Lehovec will create new work for our students. Our choreographic distinction lies in our future, so we have invited undergraduate students Charles Gowin and Katherine Williams to represent the next voices in the field of dance. For further information visit http://krannertcenter.com/.

Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 7:30pm
Colwell Playhouse, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts Lobby, 500 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana
{ music }

This year Dance at Illinois celebrates the choreographic contributions our inventive faculty and students, both past and present, have made and will make to the field. We celebrate the life of Professor Emeritus, Beverly Blossom, by reconstructing one of her signature works, Brides. Blossom, a former dancer with Nikolais Dance Theater, was an extraordinary choreographer and performer renowned for her wit, humor, and elaborate props.

Recently inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, faculty artist Tere O’Connor will create a new work for students, fashioning a cloud of humans in constant motion as a continuation of his research.

Following premieres of work in Chile, New York, Minneapolis, and Washington, DC, celebrated resident dance artists Cynthia Oliver and Linda Lehovec will create new work for our students. Our choreographic distinction lies in our future, so we have invited undergraduate students Charles Gowin and Katherine Williams to represent the next voices in the field of dance. For further information visit http://krannertcenter.com/.

Saturday, November 14, 2015 (All day)
Memorial Stadium, 1402 S. 1st Street, Champaign
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In 1868 the University of Illinois band became the first Land Grant Institution music ensemble of its type, one year after its founding as the Illinois Industrial University. In 1870 sixteen of the bandsmen petitioned the University Board for music instruction to help enhance the ensemble’s performance so that it could serve as University’s battalion band for campus commencements, building dedications, parades, and society events as well as various sporting events. The sixty-member band eventually performed at Chicago’s Columbian Exposition on June 16, 1893, the same time as the John Philip Sousa Military Band gave its first performances at the same World’s Fair. In 1908 A. Austin Harding became the first official director of the University of Illinois Band and began a life-long professional relationship with country’s “March King” which eventually led to the creation of America’s School Band Movement in 1920. Since its inception America’s public school band movement and the country’s collegiate band education system has been continually guided by the University of Illinois Band and its first four directors – A. Austin Harding, Mark Hindsley, Harry Begian, and James Keene. Join the Marching Illini in their special musical tribute during the Illinois vs Ohio State football game half-time show to honor the students, faculty, and legacy of the University of Illinois Band and its influence on American School Band Movement. Visit http://sousaarchives.org for more information.

Friday, April 1, 2016 (All day) to Friday, April 29, 2016 (All day)
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Sousa Archives and Center for American Music, 236 Harding Band Building, 1103 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820
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Harry Partch (1901-1974) was a composer, music theorist, instrument maker, and performer whose vagabond nature inspired him to explore the musical roads less travelled by his contemporaries. Alex Ross wrote in 2005, “Of all the triumphantly weird characters who have roamed the frontiers of American art, none ever went quite as far out as the composer Harry Partch.” Partch’s maverick tendencies and his rejection of traditional Western-European performance practices inspired his experimental music creations which often integrated ancient Greek, African, and Japanese theatrical arts with innovative uses of human speech and musical pitch, harmony and rhythm. This exhibit explores through photographs, music and words the musical choices that mattered most to Harry Partch.

For more information, please visit http://archives.library.illinois.edu/sousa.

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